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  • Kadiri Praveen Kumar

Spying on the Dog (or Cat)

Michelle Higgins (Higgins, 2018)


Bibliography


Higgins, M. (2018, 12 11). www.nytimes.com. Retrieved from THE FIX Spying on the Dog (or Cat): https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/11/realestate/spying-on-the-dog-or-cat.html?rref=collection%2Ftimestopic%2FPets&action=click&contentCollection=timestopics&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=3&pgtype=collection

Do you really want to know what your pets are doing while you’re away?



Ever since our labradoodle, Rocket, arrived on the scene earlier this year, our furniture has taken a beating. Sofa corners have been gnawed, throw pillows have been destroyed and sisal baskets have become chew toys. And this all happened while someone was at home to supervise him.



Contemplating the prospect of leaving Rocket alone, outside his dog crate, was nerve-racking. So like other pet owners before me, I turned to technology for peace of mind.

Surely a pet cam was the answer.

Among the latest gadgets vying for a slice of the estimated $72 billion pet industry, these Wi-Fi-enabled cameras come loaded with features to entertain animals and assuage their absentee owners’ guilt, including treat-dispensers, laser-pointing games, and two-way audio that lets you hear and talk to your pet remotely. One device even offers two-way video, so your pet can see you. And it’s all controlled by a smartphone. What could be easier?

To find out if pet cams are really all they’re cracked up to be — and to see what our dog would do when left on his own — I installed a few in the living room.

One thing I discovered immediately is that they’re highly addictive; it was hard to resist constantly spying on the dog, though he spent most of the time sleeping on the sofa.

Here’s what else I learned.



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