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  • Kadiri Praveen Kumar

KEEP THE SEASON FUN BUT NOT TOO FESTIVE FOR FIDO

Mosman Vet (Vet, 2017)


Bibliography


Vet, M. (2017, 12 13). http://www.mosmanvet.com.au. Retrieved from Keep the Season Fun but Not Too Festive for Fido…..: http://www.mosmanvet.com.au/Blog/tabid/21948/EntryId/548/Keep-the-Season-Fun-but-Not-Too-Festive-for-Fido.aspx

We all love to spoil out pets, especially during family celebrations like Christmas and New Year. Be warned though- so may of our festive foods are toxic, and even fatal for our pets. Every year, plenty of spoilt cats and dogs end up spending the holiday season in a hospital cage after binging on left over human fare.



Here’s a list of the main culprit foods to avoid:

Christmas cake, pudding and anything containing dried fruits, raisins and grapes. Raisins, sultanas and grapes can contain a toxin that causes acute kidney failure. Not all pets are affected and the toxin is unknown, but if the toxicity occurs it can be deadly. Signs include vomiting, diarrhoea, lethargy, loss of appetite and abdominal pain.

Chocolate. Chocolate contains Theobromine. This compound is a cardiac stimulant and a diuretic. It is toxic to dogs and to a lesser extent, to cats. Signs include panting, anxiety, excessive thirst and urination, seizures, coma and even death. Dark chocolate if 10 times more toxic than milk. Our website has a handy chocolate toxicity calculator which allows you to work our what amount of chocolate is likely toxic for your size pet.

Onions and Garlic. These contain a chemical compound called thiosulphate, which can cause haemolytic anaemia in cats and dogs. All forms of onion are a problem. A 10 kilogram dog would need to consume a total of about 600-800 grams of onions to be affected and this can be consumed over 3 or 4 days (so 200 grams a day for 3 days will be significant).

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