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  • Kadiri Praveen Kumar

Dogs: Our best friends in sickness and in health

Maria Cohut (Cohut, 2018)


Bibliography


Cohut, M. (2018, 08 26). www.medicalnewstoday.com. Retrieved from Dogs: Our best friends in sickness and in health: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/322868.php

Dogs, often hailed as humans' best friends, have been the topic of many scientific studies looking into how they might boost our well-being. In this Spotlight, we'll explain how your friendly pup can benefit your health across the board

According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), an estimated 78 million dogs are owned as pets in the United States

It is unclear when dogs were first domesticated, but a study published last year claims that, at least in Europe, dogs were tamed 20,000–40,000 years ago



It is likely that humans and dogs have shared a special bond of friendship and mutual support ever since at least the Neolithic period — but why has this bond been so long-lasting?

Of course, these cousins of the wolves have historically been great at keeping us and our dwellings safe, guarding our houses, our cattle, and our various material goods. Throughout history, humans have also trained dogs to assist them with hunting, or they have bred numerous quirky-looking species for their cuteness or elegance.

However, dogs are also — and might have always been — truly valued companions, famed for their loyalty and seemingly constant willingness to put a smile on their owners' faces.

In this Spotlight, we outline the research that shows how our dogs make us happier, more resilient when facing stress, and physically healthier, to name but a few ways in which these much-loved quadrupeds support our well-being.

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